The COVID-19 Pandemic: One Year Later

In March 2020, the World Health Organization declared the COVID-19 outbreak a pandemic. Conrad Siegel’s Pennsylvania offices were abruptly closed on March 19, 2020, under the order to close all non-life sustaining businesses in the state. A few days later, on the 23rd of March, the S&P 500 Index bottomed out after a devastatingly fast decline of 34% from its high in February. The world was in a state of disarray and nobody knew what tomorrow would bring.

A year later, restrictions are still in place but there is a renewed sense of hope that we will soon be able to put the fears of virus the behind us. That we will once again be able to spend time with family and friends without that worry that we may be contributing to the spread. That we can all return to work and those that lost jobs will soon find a promising opportunity. That small businesses will experience renewed foot traffic and not have to contemplate closing their doors.

As we all anticipate these things, the word “NORMAL” has been the most overused word of the past 12 months. We cannot help but look forward to better times. Financial markets, which are a forward-looking indicator, have recovered and surpassed even the most optimistic projections from a year ago. So, what lessons have we learned from the past year while seeking out the new normal?

Emergency funds: We should always be prepared for emergencies. Building an emergency fund is one of the first steps toward achieving financial success and stability. We typically recommend saving 3-6 months’ worth of expenditures in a money market account for quick and easy access. Encourage your loved ones to start saving, no matter how long it may take to build this fund, so they will be prepared for those times they don’t see coming.

Life insurance: Speaking of the unexpected, the pandemic is a good reminder that risk management is a pillar of financial planning. While death is not an easy topic to think about and plan for, the necessity of life insurance to provide for our family if the worst happens cannot be ignored. There are a lot of products out there and we typically recommend certain types over others, so reach out if this is a topic you would like to review or if you would like us to make an introduction to a trusted agent.

Estate planning: Piggybacking on the last topic, let’s not forget about the importance of having wills and estate planning documents in place and up-to-date. Procrastination is common in this ever important area. If you do not have a will, Power of Attorney, and health care directives, do not delay in setting up an appointment with an estate planning attorney. Once again, we are happy to provide referrals in this area. Finally, don’t forget to check your beneficiary designations.

Bear markets have always come to an end. But, knowing that does not make it any less frightening when watching markets drop. Recency bias causes humans to have an affinity with recent events over historic ones. When financial markets are tumbling, this bias causes us to believe the recent past will continue into the future as we hear calls that “this time is different.” Reacting to this fear and impulse in the early spring of last year could have caused you to miss out on the rapid ride up the markets experienced despite many predicting further turmoil.

Long-term investing takes discipline. We have all heard the stories of market-timing and stock-picking that promise a fantasy of riches. Speculation is not long-term investing, and often these stories do not end happily ever after. This is why Conrad Siegel believes in investing in a broadly diversified portfolio that you feel comfortable sticking with regardless of market conditions, what you read in the headlines, or hear in the news. Your strategic asset allocation, or mix of stocks and bonds, should be based on your risk tolerance levels and your financial goals to provide you with a level of comfort even when a global pandemic has been declared.

Please do not hesitate to reach out if you would like to review any of the financial planning aspects discussed above.

We want to make sure you are confident in your future, knowing that you planned for the unknowns ahead. Here’s to looking forward to normal!

Related Articles

Retirement on the horizon? 7 things to consider

Many investors are focused on the “when”, “where”, and “how much” questions when it comes to retirement. Much of financial Read more

Financial Resolutions for the New Year

Very few things in life are as important as getting your financial house in order. While many New Year’s resolutions Read more

The SECURE Act: What you need to know

The Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement Act, better known as the SECURE Act, was signed into law on Read more

Retirement is a journey, not a destination

You have likely been saving, investing, and planning for retirement for years, if not decades. Having a workable and flexible Read more